Why Work at a Startup?

Because I’m tired of explaining to everyone, I’m going to make this list to refer to anyone who asks. While I don’t think any of these are particularly original, it makes a handy checklist for anyone considering a similar jump[1].

  •  Faster time to market. At Privy, we routinely ship code that was written earlier in the day or week. Seems petty, but as an engineer, it’s frustrating to improve something and then not have it in the hands of customers for weeks or months.
  • More hats to wear. The diversity of work at a startup appeals to me. I can work on product, recruiting, and engineering. Before lunch. The pace and scope of work is both faster and longer term, and I like being involved in multiple parts of the business.
  • Be judged by customers, not managers. A startup makes each person less insulated from the market. Therefore the correlation between performance and rewards tends to be much closer.
  • Less politics. As a consequence of the last point, politics becomes less important. It’s much harder to bullshit accomplishments in a startup when the entire company fits into a small room or two. Tired of carrying teammates who aren’t pulling their own weight? Join a startup.
  • Incredible learning. As another corollary to being closer to market forces, I’ve learned a lot about how to run a business that provides value to customers in exchange for money. I’ve in turn been able to apply experience I’ve learned elsewhere that I never would’ve been able to use at a larger company, because my job title would’ve prevented me from doing anything other than engineering.
  • Challenging the status quo, not defending it. Name recognition is cool, but I never got the sense that my role at Office was about reshaping how people work – probably because our market share had nowhere to go but down. But I’ve found I don’t mind playing the underdog as long as I have a thesis about how the future should change for the better.

 

1. In a necessary but not sufficient way (i.e. if these don’t apply to you, a startup is probably a bad idea; but if they do apply to you, a startup could still be a bad idea).

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